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The RTC conducts teacher professional development activities with middle and high school science teachers across the state of North Carolina. All workshops feature the research of one or more UNC SRP scientists, provide resources and curricula to enable teachers to address Superfund topics, and include case studies that highlight at least one Superfund site in North Carolina.


Past Workshops

Cleaning Up Our Waters: Implications of Toxic Waste Sites for Ecosystems and Human Health
August 3-4, 2016 | Lake Crabtree County Park and UNC-Chapel Hill

Cleaning Up Our Waters: Implications of Toxic Waste Sites for Ecosystems and Human Health
August 4-5, 2015 | Lake Crabtree County Park and UNC-Chapel Hill

Discovering the impacts of various types of hazardous chemicals in our water.

Water Quality and Human Health Workshop Series: From Arsenic Exposure to Biological Response
Understanding how contaminants move through the environment and enter the biosphere | March 13, 2015 | Chapel Hill, NC
Assessing biological responses to contaminants: Introduction to the exposome and epigenetics | March 14, 2015 | Chapel Hill, NC

Bioaccumulation & Biomagnification: Implications for Ecosystems and Human Health
NC Science Teachers Association Professional Development Institute | November 6, 2014 | Winston-Salem, NC

From Coal Ash to PCBs: Making hazardous waste relevant to your students
NC Science Teachers Association Professional Development Institute | November 6, 2014 | Winston-Salem, NC

Introduction to Epigenetics
National Association of Biology Teachers Annual Meeting | November 2014 | Cleveland OH

Using scientific data to promote student learning about epigenetic inheritance
National Association of Biology Teachers Annual Meeting | November 2014 | Cleveland OH

Environment & Health: Making Connections through Water Quality Investigations
July 22-24, 2014 | NC Botanical Garden | Chapel Hill, NC


For curricula, activities and other educational materials developed by UNC SRP, visit our Resources page.

This program is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (#P42ES005948).