Director, Sustainable Triangle Field Site; Research Associate

salvesen@unc.edu

(919) 966-2134

Website

Biography

David Salvesen conducts research, teaches, mentors students and provides planning and technical assistance to  communities across North Carolina.  Salvesen’s research focuses on land use policies, issues and trends and their impact on the environment and the quality and character of communities. He has taught graduate courses on land use, natural disasters and dispute resolution and undergraduate courses on sustainable development. Salvesen is interested in helping communities grow in ways that are sustainable and grounded in processes that are inclusive, equitable and collaborative. Over the past two years, I have been producing short documentaries about how climate changes is affecting people across NC (see climatestoriesnc.org)

Education

B.S., Rutgers University, Natural Resource Management, 1980
M.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison, Urban and Regional Planning, 1984
Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, City and Regional Planning, 2002

Selected Publications

Nguyen, Mai and David Salvesen. 2014.  Disaster Recovery Among Diverse Immigrants:  A Case Study of Bayou La Batre Alabama after Hurricane Katrina.  Journal of the American Planning Association, 80:4, 385-396.
McDonald, Noreen, David Salvesen, Renee Kuhlman and Tabitha Combs.  2014.  The Impact of Changes in State Minimum Acreage Policies on School Siting Practices.  Journal of Planning Education and Research 34(2): 169-179.
Berke, Philip, John Cooper, David Salvesen, Danielle Spurlock and Christina Rausch. 2011.  Building Capacity for Disaster Resilience in Six Disadvantaged Communities. Sustainability, 3,1-20.
Burby, Raymond, David Salvesen and Michael Creed.  2006.  “Do Smart Codes Increase Residential Rehabilitation? Evidence from the New Jersey Rehabilitation Code.” Journal of the American Planning Association. 72(2) 183-196.
Salvesen, David. 2005.  “The Coastal Barrier Resources Act:  Has it Discouraged Coastal Development?” Coastal Management, 33(2) 181-196